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Cholesterol Education Month

We often hear about “watching our cholesterol”, but what does that mean exactly? September is Cholesterol Education Month, so with help from Dr. Shaun Kennedy at the SCNM Medical Center, we’re breaking down cholesterol, what to look for, and ways to keep tabs on your cholesterol. For more information or to book an appointment with Dr. Kennedy, visit us here or give us a call at 480-970-0000, select option 2.

Cholesterol imbalances are very common so it’s important to know how to catch it before it progresses. Most commonly, you’ll hear about worries surrounding high cholesterol, which is a common precursor to cardiovascular disease. When cholesterol levels are severely elevated, skin manifestations such as discoloration or nodules can be seen, however the majority of high cholesterol patients are asymptomatic until signs cardiovascular disease begin to set in. Due to the quiet nature of cholesterol concerns, its recommended that start receiving screening lab test for cholesterol levels in your 20s around every four to five years.

The significance of cholesterol levels can vary depending on various other markers of health. Many supplements can effectively reduce cholesterol levels but may only have marginal, if any, effects on the development of cardiovascular disease itself. The ultimate goal of reducing cholesterol levels is to improve one’s risk of cardiovascular disease. This can be accomplished with a more comprehensive approach that looks at more than just cholesterol levels and includes such things as regular exercise, appropriate sleep, stress reduction, a diet that emphasizes more whole foods, and targeted supplementation that might include vitamin C, vitamin K, magnesium, fish oil, and more. While all of these supplements can be found at the SCNM Medicinary, not all of these supplements may be indicated so it’s important that you speak with a naturopathic healthcare provider before beginning any supplement regimen.

The predisposing factors that lead to heart disease are often in place long before the development of symptoms. Regular screening and physical exam can help to identify your individual risk factors before they become a problem. If you have a known family or personal history of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or autoimmune disease, it’s important to reach out to your provider to see what you can do to help reduce your risk.

If any of the above are noticed as well as a family or personal history of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or autoimmune disease, it’s important to reach out to your provider to see what you can do to help reduce your risk.

For more information or to book an appointment with Dr. Seitz, visit us here or give us a call at 480-970-0000, select option 2.